THE METROPOLITAN JOSEPH SCANDAL: NOTES FROM THE PARISHES

The following observations were sent to Orthodoxy in Dialogue this morning by a highly placed layperson with contacts in parishes throughout the Antiochian Archdiocese. For context see the Metropolitan Joseph: The Scandal section in our Archives 2020-22 section linked at the top of this page.

Metropolitan Joseph (Al-Zehlaoui)

I’ve been speaking to lots of people about the scandal. The general story of the average parishioner goes like this: When Orthodoxy in Dialogue published the email, everyone was shocked and most would call their priest. Most priests, certainly not all, would say that Orthodoxy in Dialogue is run by a disgruntled LGBTQI+ member.

When you published the story of the homes Metropolitan Joseph owns, even the priests were stunned. That won credibility.

As of now, everyone is glued to Orthodoxy in Dialogue and goes there for information—NOT the archdiocesan website. People are sharing horrible stories about how Metropolitan Joseph doesn’t want you to go to weddings of gay family members, he would suspend good priests for no real reason other than to install his own people where he wanted them, etc. One young employee at Englewood who worked directly under the Metropolitan, just a kid really, was ordained priest and put in a prominent and lucrative parish. On and on the stories go.

Everyone wants Joseph removed now. The fact that he wanted prayers for himself and didn’t mention the woman at all told everyone how narcissistic he is.

Orthodoxy in Dialogue has become the gatekeeper for the Archdiocese.

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